The City's LRT plan has $1 billion in provincial funding. Tell Council to take YES for an answer.

All Statements of Support

  • Margaret Ferizis says,

    What a wonderful opportunity for the entire city of Hamilton and lotto win for those that live along the route.

    Please do not give in to the complaints and fears of the naysayers who are afraid their drive in might be extended by 10 minutes. They are not thinking of the greater good or benefits of the entire city. Just their own selfish self interest.

    It was misguided myopia that led to the replacement of an existing light railway with buses.

    The HSR carries over 21 millions riders per year on average and their needs should come before a few thousand drivers.

    This is something Hamilton does need now and will absolutely need in the future. The costs of such a project will only get much, much more expensive.

    Don't look a gift horse in the mouth. Take the gift and run.

    Support the LRT and save yourselves from looking like idiots to future generations who will scratch their heads and wonder what were you thinking.

  • Russell Wong says,

    Good for everyone

  • Anna Vermaat says,

    We are having a very hard time trying to understand why there is hesitation on this at all. There will be head aches, nothing ever goes perfectly smoothly but this a "No Brainer". This city is so over due to have a transit system that will work for future generations. The current generation will find out just how great it is once all the dust is settled. Remember the politics before the Linc and Red Hill highways finally got finished. We can't imagine life without them now! Just check out some other cities where LRT systems works so well. Please get on with it.

  • Peter Tracz says,

    As a citizen of Hamilton,I am fully supportive of the planned LRT project. I find it very disappointing that some councillors still question this transformative initiative.

    Specifically, I urge the City's General Issues Committee to reaffirm the project and that all members of Hamilton City Council provide their endorsement.

  • John Clinton says,

    I support LRT in Hamilton.This is a fantastic opportunity for our city and I would like my City Council to speak with one voice in their unconditional support.

  • George Overend says,

    I am astounded that anyone could vote against such an amazing opportunity for our great city.

  • Ania K says,

    Please support the LRT in Hamilton. It will enhance our downtown core, attract investment, bring in new jobs and make the downtown more prosperous for all! We need to put more of a focus on the downtown core instead of treating it like an eyesore. Any great city has a great transit system which in turn results in a thriving downtown core.

    Councillors, support the LRT!

  • matthew nash says,

    Dear Mr. Collins, honourable councillors:
    This letter is to express my support for LRT for its verified transportation, economic and social benefits.
    First, creating an efficient transportation system is a challenge in Hamilton. However, building more roads is not the answer. If there’s anything that traffic engineers have discovered in the last few decades it’s that you can’t build your way out of congestion. It’s the roads themselves that cause traffic. Anti-LRT Tweets cannot change this unassailable fact (sorry Chad). Chris Higgins, the post-doctoral fellow who authored a paper on the LRT and its effective use, recently stated "As you build more roads, it just means more people drive." Be humbled and take the advice of the experts who understand best practices of transportation. We need logical, efficient transportation systems such as the LRT to solve our mounting congestion.
    Second, numerous studies have argued conclusively for the many economic benefits. Let me state the first obvious economic benefit: 1. Billion. Dollars. This is money we are being given to grow our fledgling economy. This is a winning lottery ticket that you'd be throwing away, then taking the interest away from future generations. Also, road building is one of the biggest expenses for a city. The LRT reduces road building by taking people out of cars and using the transport network more efficiently. Further, property values will increase along the route further driving property tax revenue up with it. Hamilton needs the LRT to bring economic prosperity.
    Lastly, the social benefits of LRT are immense. We have a diverse demographic living in the downtown that needs a clean, quick and safe mode of transit. The LRT emits almost no pollution, ensuring our most vulnerable are not burdened even more by poor local air quality - see the local code red report or the global UN pollution report if you've forgotten the serious health effects of city pollution. Moreover, climate change is causing disastrous flooding, especially in my Rosedale community, and we must take big steps to curb greenhouse gases, of which, LRT is a key initiative.
    All Hamiltonians will benefit from a congestion-relieving, cost-benefitting, revenue-generating, and pollution-reducing project. Look at the facts, the numerous reports, and listen to experts who've all come out in favour. Don't stand in the way of community-building. Don't turn your back on a billion dollars (really?). The future is LRT.

  • Ron Last naGillenme says,

    Do not agree,, !! for Hamilton will just make road traveling difficult, this system is working for BIG cities built up ie. Toronto , Hamilton is built mostly flat ant outwards . If you look at the cities its working in they will be all high level cities not built flat and outwards. Will cause more travelling problems for autos then good !!!

  • Paul Tela says,

    I am an avid supporter of inproving public transportation & the concept of the LRT. However, I do not support the current LRT plan as IMO it will not meet the plan's stated objectives and is therefore not the best public transportation system that 1 billion dollars can buy.

    LRT systems are successful when they move large amounts of people to key destination points such as public transportation links I.e airpofts, Go Stations. The Queenstown traffic circle does not seem to be a key destination point.

    For 1b $$ the current plan simply replaces buses for trains which studies and experience demonstrate does not increase ridership leels. We already have a strong East-West downtown public transportation system. Why not strengthen public transportation in areas of the City that really would provide benefit.

    The current plan will not alleviate hwy traffic pressures on the the 403 and Lincoln Alexander as it does not connect to people residing on the mountain nor provide a convenient and direct link to the new Hamilton Go Station for other Hamiltonians.

    Perhaps a better LRT route that could be explored would go from the airport down Upper James to the new Go Station at James North. Imagine how many peoole from the mountain & outlying towns from Binbrook to Ancaster would use the LRT to go downtown or access the GO?

    There is ample room on Upper James to build parking lots. The current plan does not include parking. It is very difficult to increase public transportation ridership and cost effectiveness on capital intensive transportation systems such as the LRT without access to parking lots.

    The current LRT plan does not align with the already approved 10 year Hamilton transportation plan.

    I would like to see more public consultation, additional Hamilton based public transportation options and further discussion to ensure that Hamiltonians get the best possible public transportation system that 1b dollars can buy.

  • Natalie Arnold says,

    I support LRT in Hamilton.
    As a car-free pedestrian, anything that improves my options for transportation is a welcome development.
    I have lived in cities with LRT service and found it highly convenient, and the environmental benefits should not be overlooked.

    YES to LRT!

  • Thomas White says,

    The LRT is a great idea. We have Waterloo with some great tech schools. we have Toronto with lots of money, and we have Hamilton right in the middle. As someone who works in tech, this is a great opportunity for Hamilton. Hamilton has to be looking better and better for tech companies that are sick of paying for real estate in Toronto. The LRT will do a lot of solidify this relationship.

    Some small businesses may suffer during the construction of the LRT, but once it's completed I think it will only benefit the area.

    As an aside, I am a young, working professional. I don't own a car. I simply prefer public transit. How easy it is for me to get around the city using public transit is a big deal.

  • Jesse Peterson says,

    My wife and I moved to Hamilton in 2015 after she accepted a job at McMaster University. Coming from Vancouver (which has an extensive train system) we were absolutely thrilled when LRT funding was announced!

    We believe that the LRT would lead to huge local economic gains long-term. That is to say nothing of the huge environmental benefits, and improved quality of life that comes with a modern public transit system.

    If council rejects LRT (even in favor of BRT, or otherwise) it will send a very clear signal to us that Hamilton wants to remain stuck in the past, and does not understand the wants or needs of my generation of Hamiltonians.

    The provincial government will spend the money either way, so let's spend it on an LRT! Otherwise Hamilton will fall further behind, while other cities continue to move into the future by improving their public transit systems.

  • Bruno Moos says,

    The future of Hamilton,
    When many years ago, the first city administration proposed to close the main street, to transform it into a pedestrian mall, the majority of business on, and not only on the street protested vehemently against it. At that time, no town or city had executed such a project and there was no example in North America to refer to. The first planner of such a venture had to fight against all objections and counter argument to fight his way through and eventually 'imposed' the realization of a pedestrian commercial street.
    There were hundreds of arguments against it, by business owners, city councillors and more.
    Once built, against all odds, the town woke up to a totally different reality. The street filled up with shoppers like never before and all the business owners were happy.
    The next city that proposed to do the same came up against the same opposition but was able to convince the opponents by referring to the already successful example.
    Many pedestrian malls have been built since then in North America, always against the initial opposition of the same kind.
    In Hamilton, as much as I know, it never came to such a proposition. Not only that, the opposite happened: the original commercial streets were turned into five-lane, one-way roads, facilitating traffic, but chasing away business and commerce by turning the streetscape into an inferno for pedestrians, storekeepers, and inhabitants.
    Many Hamiltonian's fled to upper Hamilton.
    Since the introduction of pedestrian malls, many other urban planning ideas have been studied and explored, to improve communal living conditions, solutions to solve traffic congestion, air pollution, rapid transit, and especially to counter general urban decay.
    Again, the first cities that introduced innovative solutions were hit by strong opposition, until, again, some courageous planners and politicians carried through the projects like building subways, LRT, pedestrian malls, bury hydro wires and subsidize renovation to generate urban renewal.
    Again, other towns and cities had the possibility to learn from these pioneers and convince their constituents.
    In Hamilton, we seem to be hard to convince. Many improvised 'planners' ignore carefully researched studies and dispute findings with questionable arguments, leaving the impression that any argument is good enough, just to be against any innovative project.
    Not only in North America, with the unique problem of urban spread, but even in other parts of the world, planners and politicians have woken up to the reality that public, electric rapid transit systems on rail add, not only to accelerate displacement of the inhabitants but to create new bases for all kinds of improvements in the affected area. New housing, commerce, business, and industries are just some of the elements that add to the urban redevelopment.
    Except for a small area in downtown Hamilton, streets are littered with abandoned business and badly maintained buildings and homes, not to mention empty lots throughout town and the omnipresent utility posts, occupying a great part of the sidewalk when there is one, and the overhead wiring with a multitude of wires and transformer pots that devastate the streetscape.
    What is there more for those not yet convinced, that Hamiltonians could start to look around and see what is happening in other cities and take a step forward in a new direction of innovative improvements. People go to Europe to admire beautiful cities, and yet, Hamilton is located in the midst of a gorgeous landscape with a great potential for improvement and the possibility to grow out of its grey, miserable abandonment.

    Bruno Moos
    Hamilton

  • Chris Lucas says,

    Hamilton needs this opportunity to solidify the momentum it has recently received!

    This project is fully funded we would be crazy to turn this down!

    Let's get on and rebuild hamilton!

  • Les Szamosvari says,

    Honourable Premier, Ministers, and Hamilton City Council,
    I have lived in several cities in Canada and Europe that have an LRT system. I traveled almost exclusively on LRT because it was fastest and easiest. I lived in Toronto long enough to see the impact that the subway lines made on business and development along their routes. I am a founding Hamilton member of Community CarShare, as I believe that we depend too much on driving cars all the time. The impact on our climate and health is ineffable. The lag effect of our transportation habits will grow even if we do make massive changes. However, the LRT would be an important investment in building a 'recyclable' city by making transit sustainable after we (hopefully) end the lag effect inherent in our past destruction of our environments.
    Thank-you, and let's dream big!

  • Dorte Deans says,

    I have been excited by the idea of the LRT for 8 years and can't wait to make my first trip! Please continue the work to make it happen ASAP.

  • Margaret Ferizis says,

    An LRT would increase propery values all along it's route. More taxes for you.

    Don't make the same mistake as Scarborough councilors, most of the residents here are quite angry and look forward to the next election.

  • Linda Potts says,

    I fully support the LRT in Hamilton. While I'm aware of the short-term pain of the construction period and transition, I believe the long-term gain for Hamilton and its residents are well worth it.

  • Fernando Ferreira says,

    Accessibility for all residents of the city is essential for a prosperous city. I believe this LRT plan will do that. It will enhance the city's transportation grid. It will also attract new business, and as a result make for a better place to live.

    My vote is for LRT.

  • Alex Parkinson says,

    This is a no brainer. Build this LRT.

    We moved to Hamilton about a year ago - I'm an engineer, she's a researcher - and one of the things we loved about it the most is living downtown, walking where we need to go and biking where we want to.

    I have to own a car for my (painfully long) commute. I hate owning a car, but it's worth because it allows me to live here. Once I get home, the car goes away and the feet/pedals go on. Give us an LRT to continue the magnificent car-less revolution of this magnificent city.

  • Jim Julian says,

    Born and raised in Hamilton, and currently living in Dundas, I fully support this initiative. While the LRT plan may need a little tweaking, that's no reason to not support it.

  • Timothy Knol says,

    Go Hamilton. I believe that the sucessful implementation of the "LRT" will put hamilton on the map. And moreover, the catalyst that Hamilton has needed for sometime; decades.

  • Linda Cole says,

    I am new to Hamilton from Toronto and this city needs better transportation options for people. If you do not want this city to go belly up like Detroit then expand and get a LRT system here. I work in Oakville but live in Hamilton, but I am going back to Toronto due to poor transportation here in Hamilton.

  • Duncan O'Dell says,

    Dear Hamilton City Council,

    as someone who both lives and works in Hamilton I am very excited by the prospect of LRT both as a means of transport and a lever to rejuvenate Hamilton. I ask you to give it your full support. I would like my kids to grow up in a technologically advanced, environmentally friendly and forward looking city.

  • Patti Encinas says,

    The Sherman Hub Community Planning Team, sponsored and supported by the Hamilton Community Foundation and the City of Hamilton, is a group of engaged, informed and active citizens in the Hamilton community. We have hundreds of resident volunteers working to make the Sherman Hub a great place to live, work and raise a family.

    We've had several discussions about the proposed LRT at our monthly planning meetings. During our meeting on June 06 2016, 25 voting members of our planning team voted unanimously to publicly express our support for the LRT initiative.

    Many residents in the Sherman Hub recognize that the Hamilton LRT project is a progressive move forward that supports our vision that "The Sherman Hub is a great place to live, work and raise a family." Although it's well understood that there will be disruptions and difficuties during the construction phase we believe resulting the benefits to our community and the greater Hamilton community will far outweigh those challenges. Sherman Hub residents are steadfastly known for their support of local business and this will continue throughout the construction of the LRT. Some of our Planning Team members are already actively engaging to plan ways to lend extra support to businesses along the LRT corridor during this time.

    The Sherman Hub shares a boundary with Gage Park; Hamilton's largest city park. Gage Park is one of Hamilton's greatest assests and is widely used by Hamiltonians near and far. Given its popularity as a destination for festivals, the bicycle pump track, greenhouse, Children's Museum, community garden and natural beauty we're also concerned that the Delta Station near Gage Park is missing from the most recent route plans. In 2011, these plans included a stop at the Delta and we hope and encourage that the Delta Station be added back to the current 2016 plans. In the current plans, stations closest to Gage Park are far too distant for anyone but the most able bodied of residents to access. This is very concerning to us as we hope more Hamiltonians, not fewer, will be able to access and enjoy this amazing asset in our city.

    We appreciate your consideration in bringing back the Delta Station and we offer our continued support of the exciting possibilities which the Hamilton LRT project will bring.

    Best Regards,
    The Sherman Hub Community Planning Team

  • Toby Yull says,

    Sending a quick note in favour of adding the Gage Park station back into the planned stops along King St for our LRT. Babies, moms, families, older people....all need access to that green oasis, without hiking over a km to get there. Events in the park draw from everywhere and a dedicated station supports that use and encourages more.
    Please reconsider!

  • Ryan Strang says,

    I am in full support of the LRT for the City of Hamilton! This is a game changer for the city.

    However, I do believe that there should be a stop at Delta/Gage Park. Ottawa Street is too far away. This is our "Central Park" and it needs to be full accessible to all.

  • Christine Imhoff says,

    I support LRT <3

  • Frank M Raso says,

    Fully support the LRT.